Our school: Skyview Storm

Successes at Skyview shared by all

Student leaders Mikelle Anthony and Jake Miller describe what makes Skyview High School so special

Mikelle Anthony joined the ASB at Skyview as a sophomore.

“I wanted to be into this, where I could speak my mind on topics and change the culture at Skyview a little bit and make sure everyone gets involved,” Anthony said.

Now a senior, she is the student body president.

Jake Miller is the communications director for Skyview ASB. He has talked to the school board numerous times, promoting Skyview High School. Photo courtesy Jake Miller
Jake Miller is the communications director for Skyview ASB. He has talked to the school board numerous times, promoting Skyview High School. Photo courtesy Jake Miller

Jake Miller is involved in ASB, as well, and in his job, he gets to talk up Skyview to the decision-makers. He is the school’s communications director and he often speaks at school board meetings.

“I just wanted to be part of the school more,” he said.

He goes around asking students what they would want to say to the school board, then he relays those messages. 

“I get different ideas and different perspectives from all the different students I’ve asked,” Miller said.

Skyview is a large school, and it has to be difficult to get everybody on the same page.

But that’s what makes Skyview so special, Anthony and Miller say.

Mikelle Anthony is the student body president at Skyview, a person who wanted to help her classmates get more involved in all things Skyview. Photo courtesy Curt Davis Photography
Mikelle Anthony is the student body president at Skyview, a person who wanted to help her classmates get more involved in all things Skyview. Photo courtesy Curt Davis Photography

“We’re pushing toward creating traditions and making sure everyone is involved and making sure everyone feels welcome,” Anthony said. “That’s a big part of Skyview. Everyone loves seeing everyone else succeed.”

Whether it is in sports, clubs, the performing arts, the students all support the Storm.

“Everyone just loves seeing Skyview’s name out there. It’s cool that everyone rallies around it,” Anthony said.

“I feel like even though we are a bigger school with almost 2,000 kids, we’re kind of all united as one,” Miller said. “We’re a tighter group at Skyview. That’s Skyview. Everyone tries to build up each other and tries to make sure they succeed, in the classroom and outside the classroom, as well.”

As seniors, they found out Monday that there would be no return to Skyview this school year. These interviews were conducted before that announcement. Still, they already were missing school.

“The social interaction between my peers,” Anthony said. “Just getting to see my peers every day. In a (normal) school day, if something happens, everyone knows and everyone’s talking about it. I miss the teachers, too. The teachers are a part of your life.”

Anthony also saw her final high school softball season get cancelled. She is set to play in college at the University of Nevada Las Vegas.

“I miss being able to see all my friends and have a purpose at school,” said Miller, who won’t have a club lacrosse season in his final year of school. “I want to wake up and get ready to go to school and see my favorite teachers and go to my favorite classes. I miss some of the work we have to do because I’m pretty bored here.”

The Class of 2020 will always be remembered for the cancellation of school. Still, when things do return to normal, Anthony and Miller will love seeing the Skyview colors out and about.

“It’s kind of an unexplainable feeling,” Anthony said of seeing the Skyview S or the Storm logo. “It’s cool to know, that’s what I’m a part of. They understand who we are and what we stand for. We have a connection.”

“You see a little sticker or a decal at the back of a car … ‘Hey, I go there.’ That’s pretty cool,” Miller said. “People represent Skyview. They all stand as one.”

Advice to other students during the school closure:

Anthony and Miller, interviewed at different times, had similar messages.

“Stay positive,” Anthony said. “It’s easy to see the bad side of it … it’s easy to have those bad thoughts consume your head. If we all come together in the community and stay healthy and have positive thoughts … positive thoughts make the hard times easier.”

“Stay positive,” Miller said. “We’re going to get through this. Stay positive. That’s the best thing to do during these tough times.”

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About The Author

Paul Valencia joins ClarkCountyToday.com after more than two decades of newspaper experience. He became the face of high school sports coverage in Clark County during his 17 years at The Columbian. Before moving to Vancouver, Paul worked at Oregon daily newspapers in Pendleton, Roseburg, and Salem. A graduate of David Douglas High School in Portland, Paul enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving three years as a soldier/journalist. He and his wife Jenny recently celebrated their 20th anniversary. They have a son who has a passion for karate and Minecraft. Paul’s hobbies include: Watching the Raiders play football, reading about the Raiders playing football, and waiting to watch and read about the Raiders playing football.

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