Clark County Museum offering walking tours through time this summer

The first tour in a summer of historical adventuring scheduled for June 1

VANCOUVER — The Clark County Historical Museum’s History Walking Tours, a popular annual series that brings participants to some of the most fascinating neighborhoods and city centers, are set to begin Fri., June 1, with a trip to Vancouver’s Officers Row.

In 1906, Frank and Ella Luepke opened a flower shop in Vancouver on W 13th St. The following year, they commissioned Donald Stewart, one of the most prominent architects in Vancouver, to design a building close to the original store. The Luepke family was well known in our area for their civic work, as well as their flower shop. New owner, Bruno Amicci, has begun the Luepke Renaissance giving the architectural treasure a face lift both inside and out, yet retaining the bones and rich history of the site. Photo provided by the Clark County Historical Museum
In 1906, Frank and Ella Luepke opened a flower shop in Vancouver on W 13th St. The following year, they commissioned Donald Stewart, one of the most prominent architects in Vancouver, to design a building close to the original store. The Luepke family was well known in our area for their civic work, as well as their flower shop. New owner, Bruno Amicci, has begun the Luepke Renaissance giving the architectural treasure a face lift both inside and out, yet retaining the bones and rich history of the site. Photo provided by the Clark County Historical Museum

“Summertime is the right time to wander through and learn the stories of people who have lived, worked and carved out their place in our area’s history,” the museum wrote in a press release. “A mix of memories, research and architectural details, our history tours are a fascinating glimpse through the windows of time.”

The Blurock family has deep roots in Clark County. John Blurock, the family patriarch, came to Clark County with his parent in 1876. John started off helping his father with a dairy, named Blurock & Son. However, after some years, John went into partnership with Jere Harmer in a local meat market. After some time, his partner passed away and John took full control of the business. Then in 1897, Charles, John’s son followed in his father’s footsteps became a grocery/market owner. His success allowed him to build the home on our tour in 1905. Photo provided by the Clark County Historical Museum
The Blurock family has deep roots in Clark County. John Blurock, the family patriarch, came to Clark County with his parent in 1876. John started off helping his father with a dairy, named Blurock & Son. However, after some years, John went into partnership with Jere Harmer in a local meat market. After some time, his partner passed away and John took full control of the business.
Then in 1897, Charles, John’s son followed in his father’s footsteps became a grocery/market owner. His success allowed him to build the home on our tour in 1905. Photo provided by the Clark County Historical Museum
This church was built between 1883-1884 by the Henry and Stephen Shobert on land donated by Frederick and Catherine Shobert. They were among the first settlers in the Ridgefield area, known at the time as Union Ridge. The church’s congregation, the Union Ridge Presbyterians, was established sometime between 1882-1883 by Rev. A.L. Lindsley of Portland. The group boasted a total of twelve (12) members during its first accounting and grew to prominence in the mid-20th century. While the parishioners have moved on, the church still holds a place in the heart of the city and its adjacent park. Photo provided by the Clark County Historical Museum
This church was built between 1883-1884 by the Henry and Stephen Shobert on land donated by Frederick and Catherine Shobert. They were among the first settlers in the Ridgefield area, known at the time as Union Ridge. The church’s congregation, the Union Ridge Presbyterians, was established sometime between 1882-1883 by Rev. A.L. Lindsley of Portland. The group boasted a total of twelve (12) members during its first accounting and grew to prominence in the mid-20th century. While the parishioners have moved on, the church still holds a place in the heart of the city and its adjacent park. Photo provided by the Clark County Historical Museum

During the tours, guides will lead up to 25 people for about a mile, making frequent stops along the way to view buildings, tell stories and answer the questions of participants. Though terrain consist mostly of city sidewalks, organizers suggest those planning to attend wear good walking shoes and bring balance aids if needed.

Tours begin at noon on Fridays and 9 a.m. on Saturdays, with each weekend highlighting a different destination.

  • Vancouver: Officers Row (June 1-2), Esther Short Neighborhood (June 15-16), Lower Main Street (June 22-23), Middle Main Street (June 29-30), Uptown Village (July 6-7) and Hough Neighborhood  (July 13-14)
  • Around the county: Heritage Farm (July 20-21), Downtown Camas (July 27-28), Downtown Ridgefield (Aug. 3-4) and Downtown Battle Ground (Aug. 10-11)

All are welcome on the tours, though they are best suited for those 13 years and older. All attending over the age of six need a ticket, and tours happen rain or shine. Tickets are $10 for Clark County Historical Museum members and $12 for the general public. The downtown Ridgefield tours are free for Ridgefield residents, though registration is still required.

Contact the museum for more information and to purchase tickets:

  • CCHM  members can use discount code: CCHM. Ridgefield residents can use discount code: 98642.
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