Dr. Marty Makary: Rehire people fired for being unvaccinated


‘It’s time to reinstate those employees with an apology’

Art Moore
WND News Center

In the wake of worker shortages, a Supreme Court ruling and the growing acknowledgment that the shots don’t prevent infection, it’s time to bring back workers who were fired for not being vaccinated, says Johns Hopkins professor Dr. Marty Makary.

Dr. Marty Makary
Dr. Marty Makary

And companies and public health officials should apologize, he wrote in the Wall Street Journal.

In the wake of worker shortages, a Supreme Court ruling and the growing acknowledgment that the shots don’t prevent infection, it’s time to bring back workers who were fired for not being vaccinated, says Johns Hopkins professor Dr. Marty Makary.

And companies and public health officials should apologize, he wrote in the Wall Street Journal.

He said the efficacy of natural immunity against COVID-19 should not be a surprise, as many past studies have shown that infection with other coronaviruses such as SARS and MERS confers lasting immunity.

Makary cited a study published in May 2020 that show COVID-recovered monkeys that were exposed again to the virus didn’t get sick.

“Public-health officials have a lot of explaining to do,” he said.

“We know public health officials like Dr. Rochelle Walensky and Dr. Anthony Fauci won’t be doing any apologizing, but maybe there’s a chance large employers will do the right thing.”

In December, Makary warned that upcoming college shutdowns and booster shot requirements were unnecessary and potentially harmful.

“There will be unintended harm from this, and, of course, there’s no data to support boosters in young people,” he said.

Makary pointed to a study published in the journal Nature Medicine on Tuesday from Oxford University showing the COVID-19 vaccines can cause myocarditis in young people at a rate higher than the incidence of COVID-19.

“There will be unintended harm to an indiscriminate booster requirement at colleges and universities,” he said.

The professor also pointed to a study from the University of Hong Kong further demonstrating that while omicron is much more contagious than the delta variant, it is also  much milder. The researchers found that the infectivity rate of lung tissue – the deep respiratory tissue where severe COVID-19 resides – is about 10% of the delta rate.

Makary has dubbed the omicron variant “omi-cold,” contending it should be thought of as a common rhinovirus, in which the vast majority of cases are mild and the virus circulates seasonally every year.

“The more you look for it, the more you will find it,” he said of the virus. “It will be ubiquitous.”

He noted that if you test the general population for meningitis, you will find the bacteria that causes the disease in 10% of American noses. But cases are extremely rare, as most people have immunity to it.

“So we can’t simply hunt for [omicron] in places where it doesn’t pose a public health threat,” Makary said.

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Lorre Anderson
Lorre Anderson
6 months ago

Where is Clark County? Your state should be listed on your masthead. I searched the website and finally found a reference to being the “northern neighbor of Portland.” Does that mean you are located in Oregon? I shouldn’t have to guess.

Andi Schwartz, Webmaster/Graphic Designer
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Reply to  Lorre Anderson

We’re located in Washington State

Henry
Henry
6 months ago

Please revise your characterization of the recent study out of Oxford. Please read the study. The study reports that (1) 3 of 4 common vaccines increase the incidence of myocarditis by a rate of 9-10 per million people; and (2) covid sars infection increases the rate by 40 per million. So covid is 4 times the risk of vaccination (one vaccine had no increase).