Game show ‘Family Feud’ to feature Camas clan


The enthusiastic Schroeders had the time of their lives while competing in Georgia

There are plenty of videos floating around the internet featuring the worst or craziest answers to questions from the game show Family Feud.

Host Steve Harvey is famous for telling the family that ‘you might see yourself on YouTube for that one.’

Well, rumor has it, a Camas family just might see itself on YouTube one day for such a blunder.

But in order to give a wacky answer on the Family Feud, one must be on Family Feud.

The Schroeder Family of Camas made it to the game show after an extra long waiting period, and their debut episode is expected to air Thursday. In Clark County, the Schroeders believe it will be the 5 p.m. showing on KPDX, Channel 49.

The Schroeder family of Camas will be on the game show Family Feud this week: Tommy, Tenielle, Tatum, Teague, and Tyra. Photo courtesy Shroeder family
The Schroeder family of Camas will be on the game show Family Feud this week: Tommy, Tenielle, Tatum, Teague, and Tyra. Photo courtesy Shroeder family

The Schroeder family cannot get into too many specifics. Game show rules insist that contestants do not share much of what happens during the competition until after an episode airs.

They can talk about the experience, though.

“Being a dad and being able to go on a family vacation like that was incredible. A dream come true,” said Tommy Schroeder, or as he is known in Clark County athletics, Touchdown Tommy.

Schroeder is an assistant football coach with Hudson’s Bay High School. He is a former head coach at King’s Way Christian, and he was an assistant at Camas, as well.

Part of the auditioning process for Family Feud is to showcase a zest for life.

That’s easy for Tommy, who is enthusiastic about pretty much everything. He is absolutely crazy for his family: His wife Teresa and their four daughters: Tenielle, 29, Tatum, 27, Teague 22, and Tyra, 20. 

Being loud and enthusiastic are required to be on the Family Feud game show. No problem for the Schroeder family of Camas. Photo courtesy Schroeder family
Being loud and enthusiastic are required to be on the Family Feud game show. No problem for the Schroeder family of Camas. Photo courtesy Schroeder family

It was Teresa who submitted the application to try out for the game show. She dedicated most of the essay to her husband, father of four daughters, and their togetherness. Teresa would not compete. It would be Tommy and their daughters making up the five-person team.

It worked. The Schroeders were asked to go to an audition in Portland. This was back in the summer of 2019.

There were more than 200 families there. Organizers put roughly 80 families in three separate ballrooms. The Schroeders waited and waited and waited to be called.

“We were the last family to go in. ‘The next family will be the Schroeders.’ We jumped up and we were so loud,” Tommy said. “The gal turned back and said, ‘I guess we saved the best for last.’”

Tommy had a three-word answer.

“Yes you did.”

The producers put the Schroeders through a mock Family Feud, filmed it to see how they would do on camera. From there, they had to introduce themselves in front of a camera, share a little something about themselves.

Tommy noted he had been married for 35 years and was a former state champion coach at Camas.

Tenielle Shenae talked about her workshops on self worth for girls.

Tatum noted she is a former Miss Washington USA contestant, a nod to the fact that Steve Harvey had a YouTube moment of his own when he hosted the Miss USA contest.

Teague proudly claimed she can catch grapes in her mouth, a “professional grape catcher.”

Tyra said she can sing with her mouth closed. 

They felt the audition went well but they did not get much feedback.

“It really was a waiting game from there,” Tatum said. 

Producers would contact the family if it made it to the next level. But they don’t send anything if the family did not make the next cut. 

Sure enough, they made it to the next stage. Yes, another audition. But this would be in California, in studio. The family was booked, with flights and hotel, for April of 2020.

Never mind. 

COVID-19 hit. 

“We were back in the waiting game again,” Tommy said.

The Schroeder family of Camas said it took more than an hour to record a 20-minute game show. Producers would talk to each family during breaks. Photo courtesy Schroeder family
The Schroeder family of Camas said it took more than an hour to record a 20-minute game show. Producers would talk to each family during breaks. Photo courtesy Schroeder family

In the months of shutdown, Steve Harvey and Family Feud moved production to Georgia, to Tyler Perry’s studios. The producers called the Schroeder family and asked them to come to Atlanta in early August.

The Schroeders got there, had to take COVID tests, then were cleared to go to the studio. Shooting day was Aug. 4.

“It was my birthday,” Tyra said. “A birthday to remember.”

Still, it was not like anything they had seen on TV.

“It was weird. We had to stay 6-feet away from Steve Harvey. There were Steve Harvey zones. Normally, he’s up close and giving hugs and high fives. Definitely a different experience,” Tyra said. “But it was still just so much fun. Being with family, it was a great time.”

The Shroeders were picked to be in the first game filmed. It was the first game since COVID, in fact. 

“Of course, we went nuts,” Tommy said. “I started sweating profusely. They gave me a fan to carry around because I was sweating so bad. I had my own make-up person to keep powdering me down during breaks.”

Producers also brought out a chair for Tenielle, who was pregnant at the time, during breaks. 

In fact, the Schroeder family was in awe of how they were treated.

Tatum noted the day went long. Producers made several episodes with different families. Those who were not on stage were the audience for the other games. (During the pandemic, only a certain number of people could be at the studio at one time.)

“I was just really impressed with the staff of Family Feud,” Tatum said. “They went above and beyond to make us feel as comfortable as we could. I was really, really impressed with them and their attitudes. This was new for them, too. They had to change from California to Georgia. Nobody was complaining. 

“Steve was ready to go, super excited to be there. He liked to talk, he cracked some jokes. A long day, but super fun.”

“They treated us like royalty,” Tommy added.

And as soon as the game started, this family of athletes said they got in a zone.

“I didn’t feel star-struck at all when Steve Harvey came out. We pointed to each other. We had a little banter back and forth,” Tommy said.

“It was just like before any sporting event,” Tatum said. “You have those anxious nerves. Nerves, but good nerves.”

“Once everything started going, it was like a basketball game,” Tyra said. “It was natural. You went with it.”

Oh, and the Schroeders noticed throughout the day that other families had to be reminded to be louder.

“They never had to say that to us,” Tommy said.

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