VPS School Board votes to include renewal levy on February ballot

The district is requesting authorization of approximately $61.7 million for collection in 2024, $65.3 million for collection in 2025, $70 million for collection in 2026 and $75 million for collection in 2027.
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The district is requesting authorization of approximately $61.7 million for collection in 2024, $65.3 million for collection in 2025, $70 million for collection in 2026 and $75 million for collection in 2027

Vancouver Public Schools’ board of directors approved a renewal education and operations levy to appear on the Feb. 14, 2023 special election ballot. The board voted unanimously on a resolution at a Nov. 15 special meeting. The current levies will expire on Dec. 31, 2023.

If passed by voters, the renewal levy for education and operations would provide funding for schools for four years: 2024, 2025, 2026 and 2027. A local levy has been in place in Vancouver Public Schools for almost 60 years, since 1964.

District officials state that the local levy is necessary to make up for ongoing gaps in financial support for services and priorities necessary to deliver on the district’s commitment to offer every student a quality education, safety, and resources for well-being.

Local levy dollars make up about 12.5 percent of the district’s general fund budget. The education and operations levy helps to pay for the many things necessary to make learning possible including classroom supplies; textbooks and equipment; school safety and security; maintenance of buildings and grounds; teachers and support staff; classroom programs; extended day/year learning; educational supports for students with special needs; extracurricular activities and intramural sports; and utilities, insurance and fuel.

“We have a commitment to offer each student a quality education, safety, and resources for well-being. We take our responsibility to our students, their families, and of our community seriously. This community has provided tremendous support for public schools which we greatly appreciate. This support enables us to provide the additional resources and services that help us achieve our goals of healthy students and schools – who in turn really strengthen our Vancouver community,” said Superintendent Jeff Snell.

The district is requesting authorization of approximately $61.7 million for collection in 2024, $65.3 million for collection in 2025, $70 million for collection in 2026 and $75 million for collection in 2027.

The renewal levy for education and operations rate will be $1.99 per $1,000 of assessed property value. Voters last approved a supplemental levy in 2020. The combined local levy rate was $2.01 per $1,000 of assessed property value the first year of collection. This renewal levy replaces both expiring levies. Future tax rates are estimates and fluctuate due to changes in property assessments and area growth.

More information is available on the Vancouver Public Schools website.

Information provided by Vancouver Public Schools.


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Susan
Susan
18 days ago

You know… I’m going to have to think really hard on this. I’ve always supported the school levy before, but I’m not confident the VPS Board has their feet solidly on the ground. Inflation? Gasoline and overall energy? Food costs? Don’t know about others, but I’m about tapped out

I’d feel a whole lot better if VPS showed a bit of good faith effort at trimming costs or actually cutting back a bit… and I’m not seeing any such efforts.

Dave
Dave
17 days ago

According to Vancouver School District performance report card, 42.3% of students in the district met ELA standards, 29.4% of students met math standards, and 39.7% of students met science standards. This is for the 21,911 students enrolled in spring of 2022. Seems for the kind of money they are asking for, our students would be doing a little bit better

https://washingtonstatereportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/ReportCard/ViewSchoolOrDistrict/100278

Dave
Dave
17 days ago

I ask this question because I don’t honestly know the answer. According to this website:

https://www.datanyze.com/companies/vancouver-public-schools/299188364

VPS has 3031 employees.

According to this website:

https://washingtonstatereportcard.ospi.k12.wa.us/ReportCard/ViewSchoolOrDistrict/100278

VPS has 1415 teachers

Subtract one from the other, it leaves 1616 employees which are not teachers. Is it typical to have more support/management employees than actual teachers in a given school district?

Susan
Susan
17 days ago
Reply to  Dave

See my comment above. VPS does really need to trim some fat and eliminate some of the non-essential positions. They need to recognize that Vancouver taxpayers want some “bang for their buck” and that “bang” just isn’t being seen.

Bill
Bill
16 days ago
Reply to  Dave

I don’t know either, but I think the question is more than just teacher v non teacher. For me the question would be how many of those 1616 employees are not interacting with students or contributing to the education? Lots of staff still interact with the kids, run extra curriculars, maintenance, etc. but probably wouldn’t be counted as “teachers”

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