Volunteers help vaccinate over 930 long-term care residents in the area


Fifty volunteers visited nearly 130 long-term care homes over a two day period

CLARK COUNTY — More than 930 people living in long-term care facilities around Clark and Cowlitz Counties were able to receive a first dose of COVID-19 vaccine, thanks to efforts from local health departments, volunteers, and Clark-Cowlitz Fire Department.

Around 50 volunteers spent two days late last week packing up vaccines in cold storage bags, then visiting nearly 130 long-term care homes.

Cold storage bags loaded with COVID-19 vaccination await volunteers to take them to long-term care homes in Clark and Cowlitz counties. Photo courtesy Clark County Public Health
Cold storage bags loaded with COVID-19 vaccination await volunteers to take them to long-term care homes in Clark and Cowlitz counties. Photo courtesy Clark County Public Health

While many larger skilled nursing facilities have been receiving doses of vaccine directly from the Centers for Disease Control, smaller long-term care homes weren’t eligible. The county has made it a priority to try and reach those places as soon as possible.

The accomplishment was the first sign that efforts by the health departments of Clark, Cowlitz and Skamania counties is paying off. Their request for assistance brought a Type 1 Incident Management team from FEMA to the region several weeks ago.

Pacific Northwest Incident Management Team 3 has spent their time here working with fire departments, Medical Corps volunteers, pharmacies, and other groups to lay the groundwork for an expansion of vaccination efforts.

One of the key components of that plan was an effort to mobilize vaccinations, to reach people who are unable to easily get to a medical provider or mass vaccination site.

“Our team, with the support of our incredible volunteers, was able to successfully vaccinate more than 930 people in their homes or workplaces in two days,” said Dr. Alan Melnick, health officer for Clark, Cowlitz and Skamania counties. “This demonstrates that through collaboration between the three counties, the incident management team and our community partners, we can make COVID-19 vaccine more accessible for our high-risk populations.”

Medical Corps volunteers work to prepare vaccinations for long-term care homes in Clark and Cowlitz county. Photo courtesy Clark County Public Health
Medical Corps volunteers work to prepare vaccinations for long-term care homes in Clark and Cowlitz county. Photo courtesy Clark County Public Health

The accomplishment is one small step in a long journey to make COVID-19 vaccinations more available to people in Clark County.

As of last Friday, the Washington Department of Health estimated that just over 9 percent of people eligible in Clark County had received a single dose of vaccine, while 2.17 percent had gotten both doses.

Clark County Public Health estimates there are 89,000 people who are eligible in Phase 1B1, which includes people over age 65 or age 50 in a multigenerational household. 

Last week, the state sent 5,450 first doses of vaccine to providers, pharmacies, and the fairgrounds site in Clark County. That’s up from between 1,500 and 3,700 in previous weeks, but still insufficient to make sure anyone who wants a vaccination can get one.

Many hospitals are also receiving fewer doses as allocations are moved to mass vaccination sites, pharmacies, and smaller providers. 

Since the state now requires that providers use doses received within seven days, many providers used up stock they were saving to ensure second doses were available.

“So this week, and next week, we think there’s going to be a lack of first dose appointments available in our state because everyone is prioritizing finishing their second doses,” said Cassie Sauer, president and CEO of the Washington State Hospital Association on Monday. “I think in two weeks from now, we’ll be done with the second dose backfilling and also the Federal Supply is supposed to go up.”

Daily vaccine doses had reached nearly 30,000 at the end of January, as hospitals burned through their backstock following the expansion of eligibility. As of Friday, that daily number had cooled off a bit to 26,269.

Paramedics with Clark-Cowlitz Fire and Rescue helped to administer more than 930 COVID-19 vaccinations at long-term care facilities in the area over two days last week. Photo courtesy Clark County Public Health
Paramedics with Clark-Cowlitz Fire and Rescue helped to administer more than 930 COVID-19 vaccinations at long-term care facilities in the area over two days last week. Photo courtesy Clark County Public Health

As of this week, just over a million doses of vaccine had been shipped to Washington, and just under 834,000, or 72.2 percent, had been administered.

The state has set a goal of 45,000 daily vaccinations, but would likely need to see shipments from the Federal government nearly double from current levels in order to accomplish that.

Sauer said Monday that providers could be giving out tens of thousands more doses per day right now if the supply was available.

“Everyone wants more,” she said. “The community wants more, the pharmacies want more, hospitals want more, Long Term Care wants more. The mass vaccination clinics want more. So we are hopeful the federal supply will continue to grow.”

That effort could be helped by early March if the Food and Drug Administration grants Emergency Use Authorization to Johnson & Johnson for their vaccine candidate, a single-dose shot that has been shown to be up to 72 percent effective after 28 days, and also helpful in preventing serious cases and hospitalization.

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About The Author

Chris Brown comes to Clark County Today with 15 years of local news experience as a reporter, editor, and anchor at KXL News Radio and KOIN-6 TV in Portland. In 2016, he won an Oregon Association of Broadcaster's award for Best Investigative Reporting for a series on America's Violent Youth. He has also been awarded by the Associated Press for Best Breaking News coverage as editor of Portland's Morning News following the 2015 school shooting at Umpqua Community College in Roseburg, Oregon. The second oldest of eight home-schooled children, Brown graduated from high school two years early. After several odd jobs, he earned an internship at KXL Radio, eventually working his way into a full-time job. Brown has lived in Clark County his entire life, and is very excited at the opportunity to now focus full-time on the significant stories happening in his own back yard, rather than across “the river.’’ After a few years in Vancouver, he recently moved back to Battle Ground with his wife and two young daughters. When he's not working to report what's happening in Clark County, Brown enjoys spending time with his family, playing music, taking pictures, or working in the yard. He also actually does enjoy long walks on the beach, and sunsets.

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