Teach One to Lead One to host annual Leadership Breakfast

Annual leadership award event will be held at Warehouse 23 on March 10

VANCOUVER — Clark County organization Teach One to Lead One (T1L1) continues to grow its numbers and its positive impact on the county’s youth. In 2018, the organization had 244 students in their mentorship program. Today, in 2020, there are more than 900.

Rachel Admas-Kelly and her fellow T1L1 team members hold their weekly staff meeting to plan events like the Leadership Breakfast. Photo by Jacob Granneman
Rachel Admas-Kelly and her fellow T1L1 team members hold their weekly staff meeting to plan events like the Leadership Breakfast. Photo by Jacob Granneman

To celebrate all the nonprofit’s community, school and individual partners, they will host their annual Leadership Breakfast on Mon., March 10 at Warehouse 23 in Vancouver. The event is open to the public, and requires an RSVP. 

During the event, the group will recognize mentors and students who have benefited from the mentorship program in schools. The program pairs responsible adults with students in area schools to provide positive role models and foster respect, honor, integrity, and more. 

“We teach them universal principles, and we lead them into a life of purpose and potential,” said Teresa Lutz, executive director for T1L1’s Clark County chapter, in a prior interview with Clark County Today. “In all the news, and everything that’s happening today, we’re seeing there’s no boundaries. All of these risk factors are really touching kids coming from any given demographic.”

Graphic courtesy of Teach One to Lead One
Graphic courtesy of Teach One to Lead One

The theme of this year’s event is “Rooted To Grow,” and is founded around the goals of T1L1 to bring “stabilization and supports to students allowing them to grow strong, grow together,  and grow in community.”

T1L1 will also be encouraging community members to partner with them financially at the event. T1L1 operates its mentorship program through donations, fundraising and grants. It costs roughly $3,000 per classroom, per year, or $85 per student, per year to continue the program.

From data collected in Clark County schools with the T1L1 mentor program in 2019, a 77 percent drop in office referrals was found, as well as a 56 percent reduction in suspensions and expulsions. Overall, 84 percent of students who graduated from the T1L1 program, said they found it effective in 2019.

T1L1 Mentors from Sifton Elementary School in Vancouver pose out front with the T1L1 “Thank You” sign after completing their first year. Photo courtesy of Teach One to Lead One
T1L1 Mentors from Sifton Elementary School in Vancouver pose out front with the T1L1 “Thank You” sign after completing their first year. Photo courtesy of Teach One to Lead One

During the breakfast, T1L1 will also be highlighting their partnership with Battle Ground School District. Battle Ground High School’s (BGHS) jazz band will perform as well as the school’s choir ensemble. BGHS will also have a senior who will receive T1L1’s Excellence in Leadership Award.

To RSVP, follow the form instructions within this link. You can also email clarkwa@t1l1.org


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About The Author

Jacob Granneman is a filmmaker and writer from Clark County. He is a graduate of WSU Pullman’s Edward R. Murrow College where he studied journalism and media production. He has produced documentary stories all over the Pacific Northwest and abroad in Argentina. He has won a regional Emmy and Mark of Excellence award from the Society of Professional Journalists for his film work. His passions range from sharing the love of Jesus, to cinematography, to going on adventures in the most beautiful place on earth, i.e. his backyard. He lives with his wife and son in Vancouver, WA. Proverbs 16:3

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