Story of murdered Vancouver mother Tiffany Hill to be aired on television

The documentary “Meet Marry Murder: Hill” airs Friday (April 30) on the True Crime Network at 6 p.m.

Clark County residents will have the opportunity to join others from all over the country to view a documentary about the life of Tiffany Hill, the Vancouver mother who was killed by her estranged husband Nov. 26, 2019.

Staff and faculty of Sarah J. Anderson Elementary School pose for a photo with a memorial mural of Tiffany Hill. Photo by Jacob Granneman
Staff and faculty of Sarah J. Anderson Elementary School pose for a photo with a memorial mural of Tiffany Hill. Photo by Jacob Granneman

The documentary “Meet Marry Murder: Hill” airs Friday (April 30) on the True Crime Network (Comcast channel 308) at 6 p.m. 

“Last fall, I was joined by many of Tiffany Hill’s close friends and members of the Clark County law enforcement community, to take part in a documentary about the life of Tiffany Hill, the young Vancouver mother who was murdered by her estranged husband,’’ wrote Sen. Lynda Wilson on Facebook. “Tiffany’s tragic death led to the passage of The Tiffany Hill Act, a bill I created to provide real time electronic monitoring for victims of domestic violence.

Tiffany Hill
Tiffany Hill

“This important piece did a fantastic job showcasing what a great person Tiffany Hill was,’’ Wilson wrote. “Though she may be gone, she continues to serve and I am so grateful for the opportunity to know her through her amazing friends.’’

Senate Bill 5149 passed by a unanimous vote by the state Senate on March 9, 2020, which brought the final approval of the Tiffany Hill Act. It was later signed into law by Gov. Jay Inslee. Named for the 35-year-old mother of three, the law created by the bill will promote the real-time electronic notification of victims of domestic violence and similar crimes when their abuser or attacker is nearby.

Wilson first introduced the bill in 2018, promoting the use of electronic-monitoring technology to enable real-time notification of victims of domestic violence and similar crimes when their abuser or attacker is nearby. She renamed the legislation the following year in honor of Hill, a former Marine Corps sergeant, who was fatally shot by her estranged husband while parked with her mother and her three children at their elementary school in Hazel Dell.

Sen. Lynda Wilson offered a statement late Thursday following Gov. Jay Inslee’s announcement that all of Washington will move to a Phase 3 of 50 percent capacity on March 22.
Senator Lynda Wilson, R-17

Had the bill become law prior to Hill’s death, the technology would have alerted Hill that her abuser was close by and allowed her to take countermeasures – something the protection order she obtained from a Clark County court could not do.

“The concept is simple: when the abuser or stalker gets closer than the court allows, you get an alert on your phone. Tiffany Hill’s story makes it even easier to understand how this could benefit any number of the thousands of people who obtain restraining orders each year,” Wilson said upon passage of the bill.

Sen. Lynda Wilson and Sheriff Chuck Atkins shared a few words on the new Tiffany Hill Act. Photo by Jacob Granneman
Sen. Lynda Wilson and Sheriff Chuck Atkins shared a few words on the new Tiffany Hill Act. Photo by Jacob Granneman

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