Clark County has second lowest voter turnout in the state

Only 12 percent of Clark County’s registered voters have turned in ballots for the Nov. 7 general election.
Only 12 percent of Clark County’s registered voters have turned in ballots for the Nov. 7 general election.

Only 12 percent of Clark County’s registered voters have turned in ballots for the Nov. 7 general election

On the eve of the Nov. 7 general election, Clark County is experiencing the second-lowest voter turnout among Washington’s 39 counties according to a Monday report by The Center Square Washington.

While odd-year elections tend to see less voter turnout, this year’s ballot return rate has been particularly low, according to preliminary figures compiled by the Secretary of State’s Office. Washington, which conducts all-mail elections, has nearly 4.83 million active registered voters, but only 769,155 ballots had been returned to county auditors as of Friday, a rate of just 15.93 percent. 

The dubious distinction of lowest return rates belongs to two of Washington’s largest counties. At the bottom of the list lies Pierce County with 555,283 registered voters and an 11.4 percent return rate. That’s followed by Clark County with 332,377 eligible voters and a return rate of 12 percent. 

Still time to vote

Those interested in voting in the Nov. 7 election can see an online voters’ guide listing all the candidates 2023 General and Special Election Online Voters’ Guide.

To be eligible to vote, residents must be a citizen of the US, and 18 years old or older. Registered voters should have received a ballot for the Tue., Nov. 7 election in Washington state. If  not, contact the Clark County Elections Department.  

Registered voters in WA state have until 8 p.m. on election night to update address for the current election or register to vote in person. See details https://clark.wa.gov/elections/registering-vote.

Ballots may be returned to any ballot drop box or elections office by Tue, Nov. 7, 8 p.m.  

List of ballot drop locations, open 24 hours/day, until 8 p.m. election night. https://clark.wa.gov/elections/ballot-deposit-locations 

Clark County Elections Office, 1408 Franklin Street, Vancouver,  from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday,  and 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Election Day.

Turn in the ballot by mail: a postmark on or before Tue. Nov. 7 is required, so go to a post office and request a postmark.

If a position like school director or City Council is on your ballot, you have a vote on each position that appears on the ballot.

Voters in most Clark County cities, school districts or ports have candidates on the ballot 2023 General and Special Election Online Voters’ Guide.

In local elections, some races are decided by just a handful of votes.

For additional information or questions, see https://clark.wa.gov/elections or Clark County Elections Office by telephone at (564) 397-2345.

Election coverage on CVTV

Clark/Vancouver Television (CVTV) will provide the only live television coverage of local general election results in Clark County starting at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday. 

Viewers can tune to Comcast channel 23/323HD for up-to-the-minute Clark County election results, analysis and commentary. Live streaming CVTV election coverage will also be available to viewers online at www.cvtv.org

CVTV’s election coverage will be hosted by city of Vancouver Strategic Communications Manager Tim Becker and tax preparation business owner Paul Montague. Becker and Montague will also conduct candidate interviews remotely.   

CVTV is the local government, non-commercial cable access channel operated and funded by the city of Vancouver and Clark County. 

Some information in this report was first published by The Center Square Washington.


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