Kirkland Development unveils rendering, plans for Renaissance Boardwalk on Columbia River

Rendering courtesy of Kirkland Development
Rendering courtesy of Kirkland Development

The new development will feature a mix of apartments and retail space; it will also host restaurants and a new boardwalk

Vancouver Business Journal

Kirkland Development has released a new rendering and details about its vision for the Renaissance Boardwalk, an exciting mixed-use project on the Columbia River in Vancouver.

“This site has importance historically and is a place of significance on our waterfront. The Renaissance Boardwalk will be a gathering site for visitors and residents alike,” said Dana Gardner, director of project development for Kirkland Development, in a news release.

The new development, planned for the waterfront property just east of the Interstate Bridge in Vancouver, will feature a mix of apartments and retail space. It will also host restaurants and a new boardwalk that will connect to the Lewis and Clark Regional Trail. The property is the site of the first survey marker in the state of Washington. Kirkland has plans to save that marker and display it in the new lobby.

On May 13, Kirkland began demolition at the site, beginning with the Joe’s Crab Shack building. The restaurant closed in 2020, a victim of the pandemic. Since then, the building has been the target of repeated acts of vandalism, graffiti, fire and break-ins.

“The demolition of the Crab Shack building represents an important step forward and the start of a transformation for this important and historic site on Vancouver’s Waterfront. It will allow us to secure the property and stage for future phases of construction on our Renaissance Boardwalk development,” Gardner said, in the news release.

In 2021, the city of Vancouver approved the development agreement with Vancouver City Councilor Bart Hansen, who called the site the “gateway not only to the city of Vancouver, but to the state of Washington.”

Xperience Restaurant Group, owner of the Who Song and Larry’s restaurant that currently occupies part of the site, is working closely with Kirkland to develop a new, permanent restaurant space in the new development. During construction, Who Song and Larry’s plans to remain open.

“We are committed to providing exceptional service and dining to the Columbia River community for years to come,” said Randy Sharpe, CEO of Xperience Restaurant Group, in the news release. “We look forward to being a part of this exceptional new development.”

Plans for the Renaissance Boardwalk site include:

  • 400,000 square feet of development, including two buildings and parking below grade;
  • 230 apartments;
  • Retail space for approximately 30 tenants, including restaurants, stores and more;
  • Building to a LEED Gold standard, with up to 100 electric charging stations.

In the coming weeks and months, Kirkland will share construction phasing, beginning with demolition and groundbreaking. Kirkland anticipates construction taking about 30 months, according to the news release.

This story was first published by the Vancouver Business Journal.

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Rhonda Gibson
Rhonda Gibson
1 month ago

The city needs to provide more parking at the waterfront. As it stands now it seems like it I’d catering to people with money.

Margaret
Margaret
1 month ago

Joe’s Crab Shack closed their doors in May 2020 saying the ban on dine in restaurants was the primary reason for closing. Sweet Tomatoes restaurant on Mill Plain likewise closed, and is now plastered with street and building banners as a COVID-19 testing side.

Kirkland Development has been working to gain access to this site just east of the I-5 bridge since at least 2019.
In April, 2022, Vancouver firefighters respond to fire at Joe’s Crab Shack.
In February, 2022, the  former Red Lion at the Quay just west of the I-5 bridge on the Columbia River burned down.

Very sad to see these wonderful restaurants and the hotel burned down.

Both of these former restaurant and hotel sites are listed on the I-5 Bridge Replacement documents as sites for waterfront development.

Hopefully free public access to the trails along the river will be maintained.