Gaynor’s Automotive – Positive Reviews 728×90

Crafting ingenuity: Modulog Inc. in Vancouver

Local shop creates wood siding that gives the illusion of a log cabin

VANCOUVER — Tucked away in the back of a large construction yard in northern Vancouver there runs a smooth and efficient operation that turns everyday homes into log cabin look-alikes.Modulog Inc. has always been a family owned and operated company. For the past 50 years, they have designed and fabricated cedar log siding, skillfully installed to give the appearance of actually being constructed from logs.

Sean McConeghy, (left), explains the process of staining the select tight-knot Western Red Cedar they use for Modulog Inc.’s log siding, while his son Trevor, (right), stains the wood. Photo by Mike Schultz
Sean McConeghy, (left), explains the process of staining the select tight-knot Western Red Cedar they use for Modulog Inc.’s log siding, while his son Trevor, (right), stains the wood. Photo by Mike Schultz

“We have a product that will help many people realize a dream that they have had for a very long time,” said Sean McConeghy, general manager of Modulog Inc. “A lot of people, they have property and they love the location of their property, but the home maybe isn’t that great … our product is the perfect solution.”   

McConeghy worked as a finish carpenter and general contractor for 30 years, prior to becoming the general manager of Modulog. He also installed more than 40 Modulog sets in the area, while still working as a contractor.

Modulog was started by Ron Berge, when he and his son Steve began designing ways to side a house so it would appear like a log home. He finished his first package in 1968.

Shortly thereafter, he acquired patents to many of the components used to design the siding and signature log ends that stuck out around each corner. The company grew, and Berge began marketing his new product.

Sean McConeghy demonstrates how Modulog’s siding fits together with joints to form the illusion of a log cabin. Photo by Mike Schultz
Sean McConeghy demonstrates how Modulog’s siding fits together with joints to form the illusion of a log cabin. Photo by Mike Schultz

Modulog functioned out of Portland for close to 35 years, with manufacturing facilities in the city. McConeghy began installing the product about five years ago, and just two years ago, was part of the process when MJ Hughes Construction purchased Modulog from Berge.

Mike Hughes, the president of MJ Hughes Construction, heads the company and approved the purchase of Modulog himself, as well as hired McConeghy to run the renewed operation.

MJ Hughes Construction began in 1996, and has expanded to handle many of the larger rural, commercial infrastructure projects, such as roads, bridges and dams, put forth by the Washington State Department of Transportation.

“I was interested in Modulog because it’s a customer service oriented business,” Hughes said. “Our business in the heavy civil government work is low bid. We get work by being the cheapest guy. Modulog, on the other hand, is about quality product, satisfied customers and you can get repeat business.”

Trevor McConeghy pushes a cedar board through a type of router device that creates the curved surface of the log siding. Photo by Mike Schultz
Trevor McConeghy pushes a cedar board through a type of router device that creates the curved surface of the log siding. Photo by Mike Schultz

Hughes also said that Modulog was an attractive investment for him due to its non-reliance on seasonal work. When the June through October portion of the year passes, any construction near waterways is restricted due to fish populations. Modulog can operate year-round with no restrictions.         

With the business now moved across the river, just off NE 119th Street in Vancouver as part of the MJ Hughes Construction facility, McConeghy and his two sons, manufacture all the siding, largely by hand.

“We’ve never had an unhappy customer,” McConeghy said. “We provide a package. Our package includes everything needed to completely cover the house, it’s a 100 percent log siding package.”

All Modulog lumber is sourced from either Canada or Northern Idaho, and consists entirely of Inland Western Red Cedar which is kiln dried prior to profiling. Cedar is chosen for its naturally bug-repellant complexion, as well as it’s durability over time, McConeghy said.

Tyler McConeghy, Sean’s oldest son, cuts out a cup-shaped space using a band saw. This allows for the faux log ends to bind tightly together when glued. Photo by Mike Schultz
Tyler McConeghy, Sean’s oldest son, cuts out a cup-shaped space using a band saw. This allows for the faux log ends to bind tightly together when glued. Photo by Mike Schultz

Modulog produces packages custom fit to the home, and then ships or delivers them to the home itself. Working with new contractors and creating relations all over the world is something McConeghy says he will continue to do.

“I just had a guy last week from Sri Lanka that wants to buy a few packages,” McConeghy said. “So were growing that market. We’re also growing into the manufactured home market. We’re trying to make sure we’re bring awareness of our product to all these different markets, where we can help people realize that dream.”

 

 

We'd love to hear your comments!
Phoenix Technology 728×90

About The Author

Jacob Granneman is a filmmaker and writer from Clark County. He is a recent graduate of Washington State University’s Edward R. Murrow College, where he studied media production. He has produced documentary stories all over the Pacific Northwest and in Argentina. His passions range from loving people, to cinematography, to going on adventures in the most beautiful place on earth, i.e. his backyard. He lives with his wife in Vancouver, WA.

Related posts

WorkSource-Why-settle-for-a-job-Healthcare_728x90