Business profile: A sharp knife is a safe knife


Garrett Lorton, a former chef, wants to sharpen your knives

Beyond creating incredible food, Garrett Lorton had another priority in his 20 years of working in the culinary arts.

“I always liked having the sharpest knife in the kitchen,” Lorton said. “It was like a pride thing. My chefs would always walk by and grab one of my knives to do stuff. It just progressed into learning how to sharpen knives really, really well.”

Garrett Lorton has opened up a knife sharpening business, Garrett’s Knives. Photo by Mike Schultz
Garrett Lorton has opened up a knife sharpening business, Garrett’s Knives. Photo by Mike Schultz

Now, the Clark County resident wants to make sure your knives are sharp … and safe.

Lorton has opened Garrett’s Knives, and he will sharpen just about anything.

“Scissors, garden shears, loppers, chisels, hair clippers, axes, hatchets, anything with a blade,” he said. “I’m getting into chainsaw blades.”

(He is also dabbling into making knives, but for now, the business is sharpening knives.)

Garrett Lorton keeps a sharp focus as he sharpens a knife. Photo by Mike Schultz
Garrett Lorton keeps a sharp focus as he sharpens a knife. Photo by Mike Schultz

Lorton left the kitchen a little more than a year ago. He has arthritis in his ankles, and his medical team said if he wanted to be able to walk by the time he was 50, the 40-year-old had to stop cooking.

“You’re standing for 12 hours a day,” Lorton said.

He still appreciates the art and science behind cooking, though. And the tools needed to prepare food.

“I figured I could sharpen knives,” Lorton said. “It’s a skill not a lot of people have, and it’s something people need, especially with Covid. You’re home now. You’re cooking more. You’re using knives you don’t normally use. A sharp knife is a safe knife.”

Attention to detail is key to sharpening knives, Garrett Lorton says. Photo by Mike Schultz
Attention to detail is key to sharpening knives, Garrett Lorton says. Photo by Mike Schultz

That’s the business philosophy right there: A sharp knife is a safe knife.

“If you cut yourself with a dull knife, it’s going to tear,” Lorton said. “A sharp knife will cut you, and that’s it.”

A dull knife makes one work a little harder to make a cut, which leads to potential danger.

“Because it’s dull, you have to press harder, and if you’re pressing harder, it’s just going to rip you right open,” if there is an accident. “But a sharp knife, you’re not pressing harder. If it does hit you, it will slice you open, but it’s not going to be near as jagged, and it will heal quicker.”

Garrett Lorton was a chef for 20 years. He said he always had the sharpest knives in the kitchen. Now, he wants to make sure your knives are sharp and safe. Photo by Mike Schultz
Garrett Lorton was a chef for 20 years. He said he always had the sharpest knives in the kitchen. Now, he wants to make sure your knives are sharp and safe. Photo by Mike Schultz

Garrett’s Knives has a Facebook page to show potential customers his rates as well as where he will set up on weekends, for example. (He was at a large garage sale last week.) He also will pick up knives.For more information, go to: https://www.facebook.com/Garrettsknifesharpening. Or email: Garrettsknives@gmail.com. Phone: (503) 341-2917.

About The Author

Paul Valencia joins ClarkCountyToday.com after more than two decades of newspaper experience. He became the face of high school sports coverage in Clark County during his 17 years at The Columbian. Before moving to Vancouver, Paul worked at Oregon daily newspapers in Pendleton, Roseburg, and Salem. A graduate of David Douglas High School in Portland, Paul enlisted in the U.S. Army, serving three years as a soldier/journalist. He and his wife Jenny recently celebrated their 20th anniversary. They have a son who has a passion for karate and Minecraft. Paul’s hobbies include: Watching the Raiders play football, reading about the Raiders playing football, and waiting to watch and read about the Raiders playing football.

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