Camas Lions help restore wind and ice damaged structure at Camp Currie


The locally famous “‘hainsaw Gang’ helped tear down and rebuild the adirondack-style building

CAMAS — The Camas Lions Club recently turned out to repair a wind-damaged adirondack structure at Camp Currie, in Camas over the past few weekends.

Camas Lions Brian Scott and Casey O’Dell (front row), Billy Starke, Martin Wolf, Dick Golladay and Leslie Chasse (back row), as well as Rondo Littlestone, Racheal Anderson and Patty Wolf (not pictured). Photo courtesy of of Tyler Brown
Camas Lions Brian Scott and Casey O’Dell (front row), Billy Starke, Martin Wolf, Dick Golladay and Leslie Chasse (back row), as well as Rondo Littlestone, Racheal Anderson and Patty Wolf (not pictured). Photo courtesy of of Tyler Brown

Dick Golladay is a member of the Camas Lions, and also the caretaker at Camp Currie. Thus, the connection was easy and fluid to have a volunteer team help repair the damage. 

“When we discover the need if someone comes to us with a project, we have an activities coordinator, Brian Scott who will start coordinating with whoever makes the request and and figure out what resources and labor is needed and just put the plan together and organize it,” said Club President Casey O’Dell. “We have a lot of people in the club that have various skills.”

Located on the north shore of Lacamas Lake in a semi-wilderness setting, Camp Currie has provided a great camping and recreational resource for organized youth groups for over seven decades. 

After the intense snow, ice and wind storms of last month, the camp structure was heavily damaged; especially the sheet metal roof. The Camas Lions “Chainsaw Gang” descended on the damaged adirondack, tearing down and rebuilding parts of it.

“All the materials were provided by the Camp Currie board, and we provide the labor and the tools,” O’Dell said. “The community can help us, if they’re interested in becoming part of the Lions Club, or participating in some of the activities in the future, they can definitely go to our website, and there’s contact information there.”

Together the Lions volunteered their skills in repair, metal working and construction to fix the damaged buildings at Camp Currie. Photo courtesy of Tyler Brown
Together the Lions volunteered their skills in repair, metal working and construction to fix the damaged buildings at Camp Currie. Photo courtesy of Tyler Brown

O’Dell explained how this simple project meant so much to many of the members who helped on it since it is one of the groups first projects since the pandemic began. They are still implementing safety precautions like masks and physical distancing, but the joys of helping others are coming back, he said.

The group has been meeting virtually and doing mini service projects at the Treasure House in Washougal. Coming up on May 8, the group will be hosting a free shredding event for the community also at the Treasure House.  

Lions Clubs International is the world’s largest service club organization with more than 1.3 million members in approximately 45,000 clubs in more than 200 countries and geographical areas around the world. Since 1917, Lions Clubs International have aided the blind and visually impaired and made a strong commitment to community service and serving youth throughout the world.

To learn more about Camas Lions, visit them online or on Facebook.

Information provided by the Camas Lions Club.

Advertisement
Advertisement