Should an employer have the right to terminate an employee who elects not to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Should an employer have the right to terminate an employee who elects not to get a COVID-19 vaccine?

Should an employer have the right to terminate an employee who elects not to get a COVID-19 vaccine?
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Sara
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Sara
1 month ago

Yes!

Ryan
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Ryan
1 month ago
Reply to  Sara

Let’s hope you’re not hiding any personal choices in your life that could get you fired later. There is no way this could turn bad.

RCxyz
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RCxyz
1 month ago

It is not just a yes/no answer for me. I say ‘it depends on what the job is’. If the person is a school employee and/or health care worker (including care providers and EMTs), the employer should be able to mandate a vaccine. For most other jobs, no. IMHO.

Jack Burton
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Jack Burton
1 month ago

Should an employer (or the government) be allowed to require a medical degree to practice medicine? A background check to work with children? A drug test to fly aircraft? If you answered “yes”, then let’s be consistent.

Chris
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Chris
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack Burton

None of those things are an experimental, non FDA approved drug that goes into your body. Not the same

Jack Burton
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Jack Burton
1 month ago
Reply to  Chris

Then when the vaccine receives full FDA approval all this goes away? I look forward to all the vaccine hesitant people getting vaccinated when it gets approved next month. But we both know that isn’t going to happen…. This is simply a culture war to keep a segment of the electorate content until 2024. I do, however, hope I’m wrong and that our vaccine rates improve with next month’s approval.

pete masterson
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pete masterson
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack Burton

Sadly, a large portion of the unvaccinated simply “don’t like needles.” I’ve read that surveys have shown that between 20 and 40% of the general population “hates” needles. Such people may offer “other” explanations for their failure to get vaccinated. (I understand that an “oral” vaccine is in development, at least in Israel–if it proves successful, that will help a lot.) In many localities, vaccination rates have reached the “needle averse” point, while in other localities (and/or population groups) where vaccinations have lagged, there may be means to improve vaccination rates particularly thorough “out reach” and publicity and possibly “incentives” (e.g. free SuperLotto ticket with injection). I note that, at least here in Clark County, that obtaining a vaccination involved a considerable amount of bureaucracy and computer literacy (at the time I was able to schedule my vaccination).

AJM
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AJM
1 month ago
Reply to  Jack Burton

You’re an idiot.

Being forced to inject yourself with an experimental drug to protect YOURSELF, (not others) is a bit different than an employee checking your record or making sure you are qualified for a job. Why not fire those who eat McDonald’s every day as to protect them from a heart attack? Or those who binge watched TV all weekend vs getting off their ass? Probably should start recording activity and diet too while they’re at it, you know, to protect them.

Can I sue my employer if I get side effects from a vaccine I don’t want? Oh wait, there have been no side effects or deaths “reported”, it’s a miracle. Absolutely ridiculous. Wake up. Smell the mind control.

Last edited 1 month ago by AJM
Jack Burton
Guest
Jack Burton
1 month ago
Reply to  AJM

Wait, you’re claiming unvaccinated people don’t endanger anyone other than themselves? Aren’t they more likely to further spread the virus? 99% to other unvaccinated people but occasionally to the vaccinated. And what about those that can’t get the vaccine because of medical conditions rather than fear? There is no government mandate to get a vaccine. There may be mandates to work at certain jobs, but claiming that the job I have is a right is what is really idiotic. If I don’t like the hours of my job, or the pay, or a requirement to not be a selfish douche I can go get a different job. It isn’t necessarily easy, but living by your principles is difficult sometimes. Most of the vaccine disinformation crowd is all about pulling yourself up by your bootstraps, so I’m sure they’ll be fine.

C.M.
Guest
C.M.
1 month ago

I just want to point out that I was FORCED, while pregnant to take the H1N1 vaccine or be fired and no one was freaking out. Now we have a pandemic and it’s political instead of science based. Just get the vaccine and move on.

pete masterson
Guest
pete masterson
1 month ago

In a free country, an employer has the right to establish the conditions of employment. That means things like wearing a uniform, showing up for work at certain hours, reporting measures of productivity, etc. These are called “conditions of employment.” In certain occupations, requiring vaccinations for prevention of various diseases can be reasonably construed to be covered by “conditions of employment.” Anyone who does not wish to comply with “conditions of employment” required by one employer may choose to seek alternative employment with an employer whose “conditions of employment” are different. I do object to the government requiring private employers to establish “required conditions of employment” as the government initiates force to make such requirements. (However, it its role as an employer, the government has the same general freedom to establish “conditions of employment” as it sees fit for its employees.) There are various government imposed rules that set limits in certain areas (such as anti-discrimination laws) that are simply part of “the way things are” — although in some circumstances some of such rules linger despite the “wrongs” they were intended to correct have long ago dissipated.

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