Vancouver’s Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program awards funding to eight projects

The program encourages residents to champion projects through a competitive selection process for funding and implementation

VANCOUVER – The city of Vancouver brought back the popular Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program in early 2021, and is now pleased to announce that all eight projects advanced as part of the competitive program were awarded funding for various traffic calming elements along Vancouver streets. 

The city of Vancouver brought back the popular Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program in early 2021, and is now pleased to announce that all eight projects advanced as part of the competitive program were awarded funding for various traffic calming elements along Vancouver streets.

The program encourages residents to champion projects through a competitive selection process for funding and implementation. Funding for the Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program is available through a combination of Real Estate Excise Tax (REET), Transportation Benefit District (TBD) fees and multiple other revenue sources, providing a 2021 approximate budget of $300,000. Project costs are coordinated through several different strategies and partnerships within city departments to maximize cost efficiencies. 

Eight neighborhood project proposals were advanced as part of the program for 2021, and all eight were awarded funding as part of the city of Vancouver’s Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program, which joins with partners to help residents manage and address traffic within Vancouver neighborhoods. Most projects are slated for construction during the summer of 2022, while several project elements will be installed with other pavement or infrastructure projects in future years. 

Developed with the help of the community-led Neighborhood Traffic Safety Alliance, the city’s Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program helps residents improve neighborhood livability and calm traffic by suggesting solutions and championing project proposals. Projects awarded funding as part of the 2021 program:

• SE McGillivray Boulevard, area near pedestrian path from SE Laver Street to SE Park Street     

   Location: Riveridge Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Enhanced pedestrian crossing and upgraded street striping for pedestrian pathway across McGillivray Boulevard

• East 18th Street, near Burnt Bridge Creek Trail crossing just west of General Anderson Avenue

   Location: Maplewood Neighborhood Association, Meadow Homes Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Enhanced pedestrian crossing at Burnt Bridge Creek Trail crossing

• NE 155th Avenue/NE Countryside Drive, from SE 1st Street to NE 18th Street

   Location: Countryside Woods Neighborhood Association, East Mill Plain Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Speed cushions

• NE 58th Street, from Andresen Road to NE 82nd Avenue

   Location: Walnut Grove Neighborhood Association, Vancouver Mall Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Speed tables (similar to speed cushions)

• NE 49th Street, from NE 15th Avenue to Saint James Road

   Location: West Minnehaha Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Speed radar feedback signs and new speed cushions

• East Evergreen Boulevard, near East 5th Street/Columbia View Drive

   Location: Evergreen Shores Neighborhood Association, Dubois Park Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Speed radar feedback sign near East 5th Street/Columbia View Drive

• SE 1st Street/NE 4th Street, from NE 136th Avenue to Hearthwood Boulevard

   Location: Airport Green Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Speed radar feedback signs

• Saint Helens Avenue, Lieser Road to SE 98th Avenue

   Location: Vancouver Heights Neighborhood Association

   Project Enhancements: Speed radar feedback signs

This community-based program was delayed in 2020 due to limited staffing and potential revenue shortfalls due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Voter passage of statewide Initiative 976 (I-976) in November 2019, since overturned by Washington courts, also created funding uncertainties for the program last year. There was a record-number of project proposals for the 2021 program. This is the eighth year for the city’s revitalized Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program.

Neighborhood traffic calming projects for 2022

The city of Vancouver and Neighborhood Traffic Safety Alliance invite neighborhoods and residents to get involved by proposing and shepherding projects through the Neighborhood Traffic Calming Program. City staff continue to explore program requirements, guidelines and funding efficiencies as we look at options to best support this neighborhood program and continue its success into the future. 

More program details can be found on the city’s website: www.cityofvancouver.us/TrafficCalmingProgram. Look for updates on the 2022 program to be posted toward the first of the year. 

Information provided by city of Vancouver.

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