Vancouver Public Works crew and equipment are ready for winter weather

This effort to support public safety and keep critical streets passable is continuous, night and day, during severe winter weather storms

VANCOUVER – Winter is here, ushering in the season for potential heavy rain, high winds, frigid temperatures, ice and snow. Should severe weather threaten, Vancouver Public Works employees, plows, deicers, trucks and other equipment are ready to help keep the community safe and accessible.

Vancouver Public Works crew and equipment respond during severe winter weather. Photo courtesy of city of Vancouver
Vancouver Public Works crew and equipment respond during severe winter weather. Photo courtesy of city of Vancouver

With more than 1,900-lane miles of paved streets in the city, Public Works crew and equipment are strategically deployed in zones throughout the community in order to efficiently maximize the response to snow, sleet and icy winter conditions, using the equipment and crews available. City crew also make their own deicing solution at mixing stations in both west and east Vancouver, and supplies are currently fully stocked.

Timing, coordination and preparation are a critical part of the city’s winter weather response. Before snow falls or ice begins to form, Vancouver Public Works will be monitoring forecasts and local conditions, ready to start treating critical overpasses, intersections and hills with deicer to help reduce potential icy conditions from forming.

During severe storms and emergencies, city crews work 24/7 to keep open the major streets that connect police, fire and medical services. Next in priority are other key connectors, snow bus routes, hills, and areas around schools. 

This effort to support public safety and keep critical streets passable is continuous, night and day, during severe winter weather storms. Photo by Mike Schultz
This effort to support public safety and keep critical streets passable is continuous, night and day, during severe winter weather storms. Photo by Mike Schultz

As always, Public Works crew members remain on-call to assist Vancouver Fire, Vancouver Police and Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency (CRESA) when emergency access is needed to specific sites. Public Works’ snow route map shows where snow-and-ice-fighting efforts are focused in Vancouver.

This effort to support public safety and keep critical streets passable is continuous, night and day, during severe winter weather storms. Due to these demands, limited resources, and difficulties posed by multiple driveways and parked cars, neighborhood residential streets are not plowed or deiced.

Keep sidewalks clear

Residents and businesses are responsible for clearing snow and ice from sidewalks next to their property, as well as driveways and private parking lots. Clearing sidewalks around homes and businesses is not just the law; it’s also the right thing to do. Those who can are encouraged to lend a helping hand to elderly or other neighbors that may need assistance with sidewalks and other services during severe weather.

Businesses and residents are also encouraged to have traction devices, snow shovels, environmentally-friendly deicer, and emergency kits stocked and ready, while supplies are available in local stores.

Updates and information

Vancouver residents and businesses can view the city’s snow route priority map, get winter weather tips for transportation, water, garbage and recycling, and more at www.cityofvancouver.us/SevereWeather. During severe weather, look for updates posted to the Public Works’ Severe Weather webpage, as well as Vancouver Public Works’ Facebook page (www.facebook.com/VancouverPublicWorks), Twitter (@VanPubWorksUS), Nextdoor, and other City of Vancouver communications channels.

To report an urgent problem with city of Vancouver streets or utilities, call Public Works Operations at (360) 487-8177 and follow the prompts outside of regular business hours. To verify if an address is within the city of Vancouver, check here: www.cityofvancouver.us/citylimitsmap.

Information provided by city of Vancouver. 

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