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Escape the heat at Vancouver recreation, water education centers

City offers some options where you can splash, learn or simply chill.

VANCOUVER — The National Weather Service’s has issued a heat advisory for this week, but Vancouver has cool places where residents of all ages can seek some relief. Here are some options where you can splash, learn or simply chill.

During the hot weather, area residents can visit the Marshall or Firstenburg (shown here) community centers to cool off, meet up with friends, or take part in programs to play, swim or get fit. Both centers have swimming pools. Photo courtesy of Vancouver Parks & Recreation
During the hot weather, area residents can visit the Marshall or Firstenburg (shown here) community centers to cool off, meet up with friends, or take part in programs to play, swim or get fit. Both centers have swimming pools. Photo courtesy of Vancouver Parks & Recreation

Visit the Marshall or Firstenburg community centers to cool off, meet up with friends, or take part in programs to play, swim or get fit. Both centers have swimming pools.

The Marshall Community Center is fully air conditioned, except for the gymnasium. The center is closed on Sundays.

Most of the open areas at the Firstenburg Community Center are ventilated with moving air, but are not air conditioned.

At both Firstenburg and Marshall centers, the Wi-Fi-enabled lobby areas are open to the public, free of charge. Fitness centers and the swimming pools are available to members or by paying a drop-in fee during operation hours. Hours, schedules and other information can be found online at: www.vanparksrec.org (click on Community Centers at the top of the page).

Vancouver Public Works’ Water Resources Education Center, along the Columbia River and waterfront trail, is an air-conditioned oasis for exploring our natural resources, from the aquaria to hands-on exhibits, including the visiting Design Zone. Admission to the Water Center is free. Children must be accompanied by an adult. For Water Center information or directions, please see www.cityofvancouver.us/watercenter.

There are other air-conditioned options around Vancouver, too, including restaurants, theaters and shops, as well as Fort Vancouver Regional Library District locations. Visit the Clark Regional Emergency Services Agency’s (CRESA) website to view a list of Clark County cooling centers and tips for staying cool at http://cresa911.org/emergency-management/emergency-preparedness/heat-stay-cool/.

The City of Vancouver reminds residents that it’s important to stay hydrated during heat advisories. Where possible, stay indoors in an air-conditioned or cooled building. If swimming outdoors, be aware of river temperatures and currents and take precautions to be safe, including the use of flotation devices.

Children and pets should never be left in a closed, parked vehicle for any period of time, no matter how short. Pet owners are also encouraged to provide cool shelter for animals and plenty of water. Please note that pets are not allowed in the City’s community centers, except for service animals.

Firstenburg Community Center

700 N.E. 136th Ave.

(360) 487-7001

Hours:

Monday-Thursday: 5:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Friday: 5:30 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday: 8 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Sunday: 12 p.m. – 6 p.m.

Marshall Community Center

1009 E. McLoughlin Blvd.

(360) 487-7100

Hours:

Monday-Thursday: 5:30 a.m. – 9 p.m.

Friday: 5:30 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Saturday: 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.

Sunday: Closed

Water Resources Education Center

4600 S.E. Columbia Way

(360) 487-7111

Hours:

Monday-Friday: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Saturday: Noon – 5 p.m.

Sunday: Closed

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