Summit Grove Lodge added to Washington Heritage Register

In the 1920s, the Summit Grove property became a stop for travelers using service stations and auto parks on the Pacific Highway

RIDGEFIELD — Ridgefield’s iconic Summit Grove Lodge is now recognized by the Washington Heritage Register following a nomination put forth by the Clark County Historical Museum.

The exterior of the Summit Grove property is shown here in this 1973 photo. Photo courtesy of Clark County Historical Museum
The exterior of the Summit Grove property is shown here in this 1973 photo. Photo courtesy of Clark County Historical Museum
The late Margaret Colf Hepola (shown here) and her sons, Bob and Dick Colf, purchased Summit Grove Lodge in 2009. The Colf family maintains an event and restaurant business at the site, and continues to preserve the history and memory of the prominent local and national figures associated with Summit Grove. Photo courtesy of North Clark Historical museum
The late Margaret Colf Hepola (shown here) and her sons, Bob and Dick Colf, purchased Summit Grove Lodge in 2009. The Colf family maintains an event and restaurant business at the site, and continues to preserve the history and memory of the prominent local and national figures associated with Summit Grove. Photo courtesy of North Clark Historical museum

The Washington Heritage Register is maintained by the Department of Archaeology and Historic Preservation (DAHP) and includes districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects that have been identified and documented as being significant in local or state history, architecture, archaeology, engineering or culture.

“Having a property listed in the register is an honor,” said Allyson Brooks, State Historic Preservation Officer with DAHP. “[Summit Grove Lodge] joins over 1,500 other historic and culturally significant properties which have been recognized for their unique contributions to Washington’s heritage.”

In the 1920s, the Summit Grove property became a stop for travelers using service stations and auto parks on the Pacific Highway. Notable guests included George Brent, Oliver Hardy, and Shirley Temple. The lodge has retained its signature rustic architectural style from its original construction in the 1920s, and is the only remaining example of the “Naturalism” movement of the early 20th century tied to the auto-tourism phenomenon in Clark County.

The late Margaret Colf Hepola and her sons, Bob and Dick Colf, purchased the property in 2009. The Colf family maintains an event and restaurant business at the site, and continues to preserve the history and memory of the prominent local and national figures associated with Summit Grove.

“We are honored to have Summit Grove Lodge included in the Washington State historic registry,” Dick Colf said. “Our mother had a strong desire to preserve and restore this part of our community’s history when we purchased the lodge in 2009. We are so pleased to see it now recognized as one of the state’s valued historic locations.”

Summit Grove Lodge joins a line-up of historical sites successfully nominated to heritage registers by the CCHM. In 2019, sites added to the Clark County Heritage Register following CCHM nominations included the Parkersville National Historic Site in Washougal, and the 1963 Fort Vancouver Regional Library building.

“The preservation of Clark County’s spaces is a foundational principle of the Clark County Historical Society,” said CCHM Executive Director Brad Richardson. “More than 100 years ago, a group of locals founded our historical society and united to save the Covington House. We continue to put forth these efforts in stewardship and partnership to honor our commitment to the preservation of community memory.”

For more information, contact the museum at (360) 993-5679 or info@cchmuseum.org.

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