Price Foundation awards CCFR Firefighter’s Association funds for smoke alarms

The CCFR Firefighters Association has used the $7,830 grant to purchase 560 smoke alarms for donation the CCFR Smoke Alarm Program

The Price Foundation has awarded the Clark County Fire & Rescue (CCFR) Firefighters Association a grant for $7,830 to replenish CCFR’s supply of smoke alarms. 

Kay Dalke-Sheadel (center) from the Price Foundation presented a check to CCFR Firefighters Association Treasurer Jack Bothwell, Fire Commissioner Stan Chunn, Fire Chief John Nohr, and CCFR Volunteer Smoke Alarm Program Coordinator Tom Cook during the Aug. 22 Board of Commissioners meeting. Photo courtesy of Clark County Fire & Rescue
Kay Dalke-Sheadel (center) from the Price Foundation presented a check to CCFR Firefighters Association Treasurer Jack Bothwell, Fire Commissioner Stan Chunn, Fire Chief John Nohr, and CCFR Volunteer Smoke Alarm Program Coordinator Tom Cook during the Aug. 22 Board of Commissioners meeting. Photo courtesy of Clark County Fire & Rescue

Kay Dalke-Sheadel from the Price Foundation presented the check to CCFR Firefighters Association Treasurer Jack Bothwell, Fire Commissioner Stan Chunn, Fire Chief John Nohr, and CCFR Volunteer Smoke Alarm Program Coordinator Tom Cook during the Aug. 22 Board of Commissioners meeting.

The CCFR Firefighters Association has used the grant to purchase 560 smoke alarms for donation the CCFR Smoke Alarm Program. The alarms have a 10-year battery and are combination smoke/carbon monoxide alarms. For our citizens, Clark County Fire & Rescue will test, replace batteries and install new detectors at no cost, if needed. Smoke Alarm Program Coordinator Tom Cook will utilize the supply of new alarms to help us continue to provide alarms free of charge. Citizens who would like to have their smoke alarms checked can contact CCFR at 360-887-4609.

Additional Information:

  • Clark County Fire & Rescue protects and serves a population of 40,000 residents in a 125 square mile area of Clark and Cowlitz counties, including eh Cowlitz Indian Reservation and the Cities of La Center, Ridgefield, and Woodland
  • According to the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), 96 percent of homes in the United States have smoke alarms. That is a very high achievement. However, when fires occur in these homes, the smoke alarm worked just under 50% of the time. The most common reason is because of dead or missing batteries.
  • Clark County Fire & Rescue encourages you to check and change the batteries in your smoke alarms when you change your clocks to Daylight Saving Time in the Spring and back to Standard Time in the Fall. Be sure to check your batteries on Nov. 3.
  • Statistics show that most fire deaths occur in the middle of the night while everyone in the home is sleeping. Working smoke alarms on every level of your home and in every sleeping room more than doubles your chance of surviving a home fire.
  • Test your smoke alarms monthly, by depressing the test button, to be sure they are working properly.
  • Keep batteries in your smoke alarms at all times.
  • The Price Foundation, created in honor of Arlene Goheen Price and Frank Price, was created for the purpose of providing education, health, and historical preservation to Clark and Cowlitz Counties. More information is available at www.pricefoundation.net

Information provided by Clark County Fire & Rescue.

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