Area residents asked to stay cool and be safe as summer construction heats up

Clark County projects to take place in coming months

CLARK COUNTY — As the warm summer sun shines down, construction projects are revving up in Clark County. With four large construction projects happening on Interstate 5 and I-205, as well as State Route 14 and SR 500 this summer, we’ll all need to be prepared for some congestion or travel delays.

We know summer road work can be frustrating, but warm, dry weather is needed for asphalt to set and harden and roadway paint to stick to the pavement, leaving us a small window to get this work completed. We try to schedule work at night or off-peak times when possible and we appreciate your patience during the times that’s not possible. A little planning will go a long way in helping all of us reach our destinations safely and on time.

Clark County summer construction

Area residents asked to stay cool and be safe as summer construction heats up
Locations of summer construction projects in Clark County are shown on this map. Image courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

I-5 and I-205 Pavement Rehabilitation

Anyone who travels on I-5 or I-205 in Clark County is familiar with the thump-tha-thump-thump sound from the ruts and cracks in the pavement. Beginning in late July, crews will replace worn asphalt and concrete panels on both directions of I-205 between the Glenn Jackson Bridge and the I-5/I-205 split, and on southbound I-5 between SR 502 near Battle Ground and the I-5/I-205 split. To minimize disruptions, most of the work will be done at night with lane closures, as well as some overnight ramp closures on I-205.

Area residents asked to stay cool and be safe as summer construction heats up
I-5 in Clark County. Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

SR 500 between Saint John’s Boulevard and Fourth Plain Boulevard Paving and Expansion Joints

You may recall that due to a high number of crashes, this past fall we removed the traffic signals on SR 500 at the intersections of Northeast Falk Road/42nd Avenue and Northeast 54th Avenue/Northeast Stapleton Road in Vancouver. Starting in late July, crews will widen the SR 500 ramps at those same intersections as part of a project to pave the highway between Burnt Bridge Creek near St. John’s Boulevard and Fourth Plain Boulevard. Work will also include replacing the bridge expansion joints on the SR 500 overpass, over I-205, and updating sidewalk ramps to improve access

This weather-sensitive work will require weekend closures of sections of SR 500 between I-5 and Northeast Fourth Plain Boulevard, as well as some lane and ramp closures, so be sure to check travel conditions before you go, and expect delays.

Area residents asked to stay cool and be safe as summer construction heats up
SR 500 at Northeast Falk Road/42nd Avenue in Vancouver. Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

SR 14 between Vancouver and Camas Paving

Folks heading into the Gorge could encounter a couple of work zones as crews pave both directions of SR 14 between Southeast 164th Avenue in Vancouver and Northwest 6th Avenue in Camas. Construction is expected to take a little more than one month and the work and lane closures will occur mostly at night. The on- and off-ramps at Southeast 192nd Avenue will also close for overnight paving.  

SR 14 Washougal Roundabouts

Farther east, expect delays in Washougal as work is underway to build roundabouts on SR 14 at the intersections of Washougal River Road/15th Street and 32nd Street. We’ll try to minimize travel delays as much as possible, but there will be several closures and delays during construction. When complete, travelers will encounter fewer travel backups and delays through the area.

Area residents asked to stay cool and be safe as summer construction heats up
SR 14 at 32nd Street in Washougal. Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

Work on all of these projects is weather dependent and scheduled to wrap up before the end of the year.

Safety

While you’re traveling this summer, we hope you keep this mangled mess of metal that was once one of our work trucks in mind. It’s a powerful reminder of the dangers our crews face every day when working along area roadways, and why we need everyone’s help in work zones. A semi struck the three-quarter ton pickup truck and it crushed like a soda can. Thankfully, the driver of the pickup had exited it less than a minute before the crash and none of the crew was injured.

Area residents asked to stay cool and be safe as summer construction heats up
This crushed work truck is a good reminder to take care while driving in work zones. Photo courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation

Work zone crashes aren’t just dangerous for workers – travelers are also at risk during crashes or other incidents. Last year, 94 percent of Washington roadway work zone fatalities and injuries were to drivers, their passengers or pedestrians. Many of these crashes are preventable, as the number one reason for crashes in work zones is distracted drivers, followed by impairment and speeding.

 Whenever you’re in a work zone please remember to slow down to the posted speed and pay attention to signs, workers and other travelers around you. If you can, move over a lane to give workers more space. It’s also good to allow extra time if traveling through a construction zone. If you do face delays, remember to stay calm – it’s not worth risking someone’s life.

Traveler tips

While we can’t promise a congestion-free trip, we provide lots of information to help you make informed choices about getting around during construction. You can sign up for Clark County construction email alerts  and you can get 24/7 travel information via the WSDOT mobile app and the regional Twitter account.

Be sure to check with the City of Vancouver and Clark County for updates on other area road projects. As you head out to enjoy our long summer days and cool nights, please watch for signs, flaggers and pilot cars to guide you through construction zones, and drive carefully! Getting through construction can take a little more time than we’re used to, but once the work is complete, it’s easy to enjoy the long-term benefits of a smooth ride.

Information provided by Washington State Department of Transportation.

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